What people say

New York, July 4th, 2000

Sedia di Angelo a Will Barnet copia“I don’t remember the exact date meeting Angelo sometime 1952-53 or the circumstances but from the very day we met we became close friends in our outlook about life and Art. I admired Angelo’s work from the early years until his last white meditation chapel, his prints & paintings. He was totally part of our family. His great warmth, kindness and thoughtfulness echos throughout the many decades we were together. An example of Angelo’s concern for a friend was when I told him how much my back hurt me after a day of painting. His concern was immediate! He noticed that I stood up painting or sitting on a stool without nothing to support my back. The next day Angelo is at my door with a chair with a Back. (carried it! from the store) I still have this chair after many years. I call this chair my little Angelo and it is like his presence is here all the time. For Angelo kind words are very nice but deeds meant more. I can remember that day – I see him straighten up in a military fashion with chin up and march off to do another good deed for a friend. He called himself the Red Devil (always wearing red) but he was really a true Angel.”

 Will Barnet

“These are white spaces into which the viewer cannot enter and which contain white paintings. Their symmetry gives them the quality of serenity, and they appear to be permeated by etherealized light. These works are meant to be contemplated that is they open the way to achieving a metaphysical experience and a state of happyness, consistent with Dante’s purpose in the Divine Comedy.”

James Harithas,
director of the museum “The Corcoran Gallery”

 

“How did that mild mannered artist who used to walk along Via Margutta and visit exhibitions dare make the enormous leap to another continent, to the USA, where he did not speak the language and choose New York as his new home, a modern-day Babel, a city of chaos, a melting pot of races, a city which devours men and their talent? It seemed like an impossible feat and many of us asked ourselves why he had chosen to do it. Yet when we went to America, Savelli became a base for many of us.”

Milena Milani,
Informatore librario
year XI, n. 10, ottobre 1981

“An angel among demons, I recall the gentle way he moved among his works, regarding them with affection; the patience with which he considered wy questions and his natural wisdom, bestowed with grace and generosity upon all who were fortunate enough to know him.”

 Antonella Soldaini
Pecci Museum (Prato – Italy) 1995
Charta catalog

“… None of what has occurred in recent painting has been ignored or denied. The reference point or starting point [of Savelli] is not Maleviç, Mondrian or Nicholson with their idea of a structure or concept which exist prior to material. If anything it’s Rothko, the painter who finally managed to establish an absolute balance between the Western and Far Eastern visual poetics, finding in the act of painting a practice of contemplation; in the space of existence the dimension of cosmic space; in the light of day the light of the revelation. (…) Savelli wants to find the light, but not in the naturalistic sense or as an a priori condition of every single image, but as an a priori image. If the light is an image, if there is a perception of light as separate from light, the way the perception of a tree is separate from the tree, then light, just like space, takes form in images which are always different. Light manifests itself the way space once manifested itself: geometry, which was the procedure to present or ‘make’ space, now becoming the procedure to present or make light.”

Piero Donato
From the interview by Antonella Soldaini,
Pecci Museum (Prato – Italy) 1995 – Charta catalog
“… None of what has occurred in recent painting has been ignored or denied. The reference point or starting point [of Savelli] is not Maleviç, Mondrian or Nicholson with their idea of a structure or concept which exist prior to material. If anything it’s Rothko, the painter who finally managed to establish an absolute balance between the Western and Far Eastern visual poetics, finding in the act of painting a practice of contemplation; in the space of existence the dimension of cosmic space; in the light of day the light of the revelation. (…) Savelli wants to find the light, but not in the naturalistic sense or as an a priori condition of every single image, but as an a priori image. If the light is an image, if there is a perception of light as separate from light, the way the perception of a tree is separate from the tree, then light, just like space, takes form in images which are always different. Light manifests itself the way space once manifested itself: geometry, which was the procedure to present or ‘make’ space, now becoming the procedure to present or make light.”
Giulio Carlo Argan

“When Savelli discusses his use of white, he talks about white as being or representing interior. But it is not simply inside, as he explains, because there is darkness there. This white he has used exclusively for over twenty five years refers to a light that comes out of obscurity, the acceptance of the shadows of the inner self and yields another kind of light: as in the world enlightenment… Savelli continued to actively probe the world of white geometrie forms which resonate with singular allure and mystery. Bis accomplishment, his oeuvre, is testimony to a gentle spirit, a determined search, and an unyielding will to create universal statements about the human light within.”

Ned Rifkin
Curator of The “Corcoran Gallery of Art”
Washington, D.C. September, 1984

“Often white – and for decades Savelli did not used any other colours – is a point of no return of progressive abstraction and conceptual purification… all of Savelli’s work moves along two tracks: a reductive vocation on the one side and a liberating transgression on the other. This reflects Savelli’s dual cultural identity – one European, the other American – which made it possible for him to not fully embrace the Puritan minimalism that was trending in the United States nor to remain attached to a Utopian-yet-rationalising form of abstract art, heir of the European avantgardes. ”

 

Marco Meneguzzo

The Great Savelli

“Angelo lived creating a luminous white space shaped of raw canvas and white paint a vast white space he created to cover his visual field Large decisive geometric dreams shaped with a pair of cutting shears It was this white light like air he sought to express a light of emergence This luminescence grew into a white sphere finally blotting him out No longer visible to the world…enveloped by an ethereal white air Angelo is there toasting with white wine still insisting teaching art and proper etiquette to a Red Devil.”

David Rubello Poem

“… Savelli is the artist who was least corrupt by culture, politics, marketing and life itself that I have ever met. His dedication and his loyalty to the aspirations of art as a means of communication and liberation of the human soul are absolute. He continued to do art his way on both sides of the Atlantic, without compromising or receiving protection; on the contrary, he refused protection as soon as he became aware of the advantages he could have gained. (…) Savelli’s case is such a rare example of the autonomy of the artist surrounded and tempted by worldly culture, so extreme to almost expand into the realms of solitude. But it is this aspiration to the blessed condition of ‘solitary’ contemplation that, in my opinion, is one of the main themes of the Maestro’s art. Another is his desire to represent a world which is barely perceptible to our numbed senses, one which is made of shapes, spaces, lights and shades that exist also beyond the limits of gravity, space and time, freely crossing over into the awareness of the ‘deep’ and the imaginary. Savelli’s white, similarly to Maxwell’s colour top, is the summary of all colours, both a state of tranquillity and the beginning of the rainbow, at the limit of the threshold of perception.”

Piero Dorazio

“The white represents the secret inner light toward which you walk along a mysterious path of relationship and communication between the inside and the outside, in a free and unpredictable circulation of the aura.”

Vittoria Biasi,
Rome 1994